All posts in think

CLNZ18 Final Speaker Line-up | Intersecting Greatness

Have you registered yet?

So excited to finalise the impressive humans speaking / taking workshops / masterclasses at Creative Leadership NZ 2018:

  • cofounder of Masterclass
  • world’s first female beatbox champion
  • senior director from Weta Workshop
  • industry leading foresight practitioner
  • associate prof in innovation management
  • international gender and diversity consultant
  • innovation officer for one of the largest iwi’s in NZ
  • president of LIANZA
  • CE of NZTE

With 3 out of 4 categories already SOLD OUT and just 30 spots remaining:

REGISTER NOW

#TeamKindness | Leading Leaders To Care

Feeling lucky to be a citizen of a country when the prime minister, Jacinda Ardern, says stuff like:

If I could distill it down into one concept that we are pursuing in New Zealand, it is simple and it is this: kindness.

In this time of hollow nationalism and fracturing distrust, a call for compassion, togetherness, thinking of the other truly is unusual and all the more important as we struggle forward in these dark times.

Sign me up for ‘team kindness’. Who else is with me?

Hat-tip Shepard Fairey plus large image for downloading / sharing on.

BIF2018 | Connecting, Catalysing And Colliding Communities

BIF2018 Saul

Reflecting on my first Business Innovation Factory Summit (BIF) in Providence, Rhode Island.

Just spent the past two days surrounded by a few hundred ‘innovation junkies’ at BIF2018. The eclectic mix of 32 storytellers echoed the TED format in their variety and structure (each had about 15/20mins to share), and was hosted wonderfully in the Trinity Rep, Providence, Rhode Island.

The broad time given for networking during the breaks and lunch along with the encouragement of MC / Founder Saul Kaplan to add value to each in conversations really amplified into action.

Also, the cross over of the HATCH network (where I attended in 2013, 2014, 2016) added a deeper experience, and was so invigorating to reconnect with this generous and truly special group of humans:

Networks colliding into other networks is crucial in igniting fresh thinking, creative potential and releasing positive energy – just like HATCH and many other TEDx and other events I’ve attended, BIF2018 ignited the desire to stretch myself and also trust my voice in my current efforts.

Truly hoping some of the participants and attendees will also make the trip out to Creative Leadership NZ 2018 at the end of the year (as made an juicy offer through the network).

Creative Leadership NZ 2018 Registrations Open | Get In There

Grab your space (or spaces) now!

A couple of hours ago I opened the public registrations for Creative Leadership NZ 2018:

A two day conference connecting visionary humans into a creative community to solve contemporary challenges.

Just like last years sold out effort, the mission is to build a network of pioneers who share the ability to respond to change, identify opportunities and act on them to better shape our collective future here in New Zealand and beyond.

Held at the new NZ Insitute of Creativity, Te Auaha, on 3rd and 4th December 2018, the line-up is already looking stellar, and includes, cofounder of Masterclass, world’s first female beatbox champion, senior director from Weta Workshop, industry leading foresight practitioner, associate prof in innovation management, president of LIANZA plus CE of NZTE.

This will be another independently produced and financed event delivered under the Creative Welly banner which is “an independent collective – globally minded / locally focussed – providing leadership, action and connections across sectors, with the aim to build the most creative little capital in the world.”

REGISTER NOW

Feel free to share the image above through your networks and channels please.

Hope to see you there!

Coming Soon | CLNZ18

A two day conference connecting visionary humans into a creative community to learn how to solve contemporary challenges.

Here we go again:

CLNZ18 brings together CEOs, senior executives, emerging leaders, experts, and aspiring entrepreneurs, for two days, to access experience, insight and new processes to realise their own projects and potential.

The mission is to build a network of pioneers who share the ability to respond to change, identify opportunities and act on them to better shape our collective future here in New Zealand and beyond.

Sign up to receive the announcement details on July 10th and grab the early bird rate plus other registration categories (like good bird and group options).

Related post: Creative Leadership NZ 2017 | Reflections & Insights
sacrificing quiet places quote nicholas carr

The Pauses We’ve Lost | The Cost Of Skippable Media

sacrificing quiet places quote nicholas carr

Why waiting was / is a good thing.

There was a time when the height of technological superiority was how slow the tape deck opened. The smooth, deliberate action hinted at a deeper level of sophistication and created a moment or two of heightened expectation.

tape

All media was slow and on its own timetable, like TV programmes, magazines and newspapers, to consume them meant waiting for their delivery. These pauses in our consumption related directly to the increased intention to savour the outcome.

As we know, the cassette went on to become one of the first portable mediums which influenced a whole set of other disruptive technologies; minituarising hardware which would enable us all to eventually take our music, then media, and now, our online and networked world, with us.

Three decades later, nearly all media is now transient. Fleeting. Immediate. Skippable. Waiting times are mere milliseconds, and even then we guffaw at any buffering icons working to serve us another video of a kid falling off a piano or a cat running into a tree.

If we lose those quiet spaces, or fill them up with “content”, we will sacrifice something important not only in our selves but in our culture.
Nicholas Carr via the article ‘Is Google Making Us Stupid’

Maybe it’s nostalgia relating to being of a generation who knew that watching movies meant putting on a coat and getting out money and the house due to a trip to the cinema or the video store. Or when recording television programmes meant running up or down the stairs and pressing the record button when they were literally ‘on’. Or from the experience of having to wait up to ten or twenty minutes for games to be loaded into my ZX Spectrum etc.

These delays were inherent. Built in. Welcomed even. There was space. Time. Time to create. Reflect. Be.

Technology has decreased patience along with the capacity to accept any empty length of time as a positive factor in the equation of the experience—waiting simply creates another opportunity to gaze into another screen and skip again. Our whole media interaction to the world has become skippable but what have we lost in those moments? What is the cost?

Social media (the industry I gave up this year after being in it for over a decade) has become diluted with “experts” throwing around words like connection, transparency, authenticity, engagement, but there’s fewer voices championing trusting the consumer with making balanced choices, framing content which situates us into the now and championing taking time offline or with others.

This isn’t a one way deluge. We produce more than ever before. We are saturating each other with our requests for attention and validation that our meal or view or opinion means something beyond our own experience of it. The cloud has given us immediacy although it only fogs our view to the importance of discernment. Of choosing better.

All brands and organisations care about is eyeballs. Attention. But it’s the lingering that matters. That’s where the impact is. The video or blog post which creates space and reflection are the ones folks remember.

It’s time to take time back again. To focus on the pauses. To stop hurrying and start living in the conscious(ly created) delays. To start appreciating the slow openers again.

It's OK Not To...

It’s OK Not To… | Be Kind, Add Value

It's OK Not To...

This is not about innovation / tech / startups / disruption / the net / hustling.

Despite the awful (your / you’re) error, I tweeted the above and many seem to like it (also got my tweetmails auto-posting to Linkedin and lots appreciate it on there as well):

Just in case you’ve forgotten, it’s OK not to:
– have an interest in innovation
– be involved in the tech sector
– be in the start-up scene
– care about disruption
– like the internet
– hustle
…as long as you’re kind, adding value to the world & feeling good, you’re winning!

What else am I missing?

taking a TEDx break

Taking A TEDx Break | Resetting The Sights

taking a TEDx break

Why TEDxWellington isn’t happening this year.

A few weeks ago I had to share with the TEDxWellington leadership team that I needed to take a break. A venue had already booked for the 2018 event and we were days away from announcing. It was a tough but right decision to make.

For a little over 6 years I’ve been the licensee / creative producer for 5 main TEDx events here in Wellington, plus the two livestream TEDxWomen events and also 8 Salon evening events (which keep the community engaged in between the main ones plus celebrate the success of our previous speaker / performers). Every event has been sold out and all finances are run through the xWellington Charity (which was set up with myself and fellow trustees Helen and Hannah).

*The chunky time commitment has also been matched by a personal monetary investment with three trips to attend two TEDActives (the first to enable us to get the city license and name) and one TEDFest (whereby nearly every other TEDx organiser I spoke to knew about our creative efforts with the TEDx format, specifically our 2016 trust event which sold out in two minutes flat, did things no other TEDx had ever dared and got featured on ted.com).

So why take a break now?

Especially after the massive success of last years 1,000 strong event (with 5,000 souls watching online)!

Well, it came down to three reasons:

  • needing to pay the rent—as you can imagine producing events at that scale is a full time job in itself. Under the TEDx rules (see General > Funds) no TEDx and its organisers are allowed to make money as it’s a voluntary venture only. Very much agree and champion this, although, at the moment there are other things which need to take priority (like paying the rent sustainably);
  • reciprocal energies—on occasions we’ve literally had to expend so much energy just to get access to certain venues or to available dates that it impacted on other aspects of our endeavours. We were hoping for a growing support from certain sections of the community based on the demonstrative success achieved rather than diminishing assistance. Obviously, big learning opportunities for doing things differently to get different results, and another reason to take a break to reflect on future strategies;
  • continued impact momentum—with any growth you certainly don’t want to retract and the 2018 plans, due to some odd factors, meant we were left looking at significantly reducing the event size (which would have a massive negative effect on other areas like sponsor / partner agreements). As a capital city event we were hoping to continue the legacy building and I’m certainly not interested in leading something that is less.

So the public announcement was made at our last community Salon event and the feedback was vastly positive plus highly compassionate.

Special thanks to the leadership team who have been so courteous in supporting my decision as it came so late in the day.

After a few months sights will be realigned for the 2019/2020 events and a slow run up will begin with new ideas / approaches to hopefully get to that desired different outcome.

Efforts will be made to gain support for a sustainable TEDx in the nations capital, a cornerstone in the calendar which uniquely amplifies the regions talent through the talks / performances / global platform, continue to build the social capital via the amazing community, plus proceeds to provides opportunities for the organisers to craft experiences that develop our city’s reputation as forward thinkers and audacious doers (and all the while developed / delivered by volunteers).

*financial support was received from a TEDxWellington sponsor for the first TEDActive to cover flight costs plus contributions from the charity towards attendance / accommodation costs also.

Same But Different | The Minimalists Jazz Model

Love people and use things, because the opposite never works. the minimalists quote

Could you take what you do, do the same, but different, as a way to evolve the offer and ensure creative continuity?

Had the pleasure to spend time on the weekend with pals Ryan and Josh, who together are The Minimalists.

Ever since we connected online in 2010 (when I was starting my minimalist journey), have watched with smiles and head-nods the flourishing of these remarkable humans.

What started as a blog, curating experiences from a lifestyle change, it’s now morphed into:

the minimalists and DK

In conversation over breakfast, I shared ideas about creativity and being vulnerable, just like a jazz band.

The core idea is about creating space then trust in the ability of your other band members to add value in the gaps. A strategy which means being open to risk and curious enough to ask the question in the first place.

This is the model The Minimalists have been exploring for the past 7/8 years, and a lesson for us all in doing the same, but different, as a way of adding value to the central cause.

Are you doing the same?

 

The jazz analogy was borrowed from the workshop run by Aithan Shapira at last years Creative Leadership NZ conference