All posts tagged space

#20 August 2020 | Monthly Digital Breadcrumbs

Things found, then shared online, last month, now curated in one place.

READ

Facilitating Inspiration (aka Herding Cats) explores the components of effective facilitation & my reflections of the recent ‘Creative Ideation Workshop.’

From those clever duo at The Minimalists, a guide to start a blog in 2020.

If Facebook were a country it would be North Korea.

After someone posted about having cancer on Facebook their feed became full of ‘Alternative Care’ ads.

Astronomers detect regular rhythm of radio waves (I want to believe).

WATCH

The above are the first three episodes of Creative Welly… subscribe here!

EXPLORE

Over 500 customizable free SVG icons.

Rave DJ allows you to mashup up to songs (or more) on YouTube (here’s my attempt).

Now’s your chance to apply to be a TED Fellow!

Image credit: Steve Cutts.
All monthly digital breadcrumbs posts.

#15 March 2020 | Monthly Digital Breadcrumbs

A bunch of wild and wonderful things to spend your time on.

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Another face-collecting AI company hosting three billion images hacked (this one scrapped their database from Facebook so nothing to worry about really).

How Amazon tracks all that you read.

About a mystery radio signal from deep space appears to be following a 16-day cycle.

Some deep truths here about the lack of ethic consideration in technology advancements.

How 1,000 is now a 100 in terms of what is needed as a fan base to sustain oneself.

WATCH

EXPLORE

Those nice people from The Smithsonian Institute have just released 2.8 million images free to access and use.

150,000 botanical and animal illustrations available for free download from Biodiversity Heritage Library.

This great example of environmental storytelling & journalism from Norway.

A brimming online database of old book illustrations.

All monthly digital breadcrumbs posts.
Image credit: mine, sunset colours over Welly.
sacrificing quiet places quote nicholas carr

The Pauses We’ve Lost | The Cost Of Skippable Media

sacrificing quiet places quote nicholas carr

Why waiting was / is a good thing.

There was a time when the height of technological superiority was how slow the tape deck opened. The smooth, deliberate action hinted at a deeper level of sophistication and created a moment or two of heightened expectation.

tape

All media was slow and on its own timetable, like TV programmes, magazines and newspapers, to consume them meant waiting for their delivery. These pauses in our consumption related directly to the increased intention to savour the outcome.

As we know, the cassette went on to become one of the first portable mediums which influenced a whole set of other disruptive technologies; minituarising hardware which would enable us all to eventually take our music, then media, and now, our online and networked world, with us.

Three decades later, nearly all media is now transient. Fleeting. Immediate. Skippable. Waiting times are mere milliseconds, and even then we guffaw at any buffering icons working to serve us another video of a kid falling off a piano or a cat running into a tree.

If we lose those quiet spaces, or fill them up with “content”, we will sacrifice something important not only in our selves but in our culture.
Nicholas Carr via the article ‘Is Google Making Us Stupid’

Maybe it’s nostalgia relating to being of a generation who knew that watching movies meant putting on a coat and getting out money and the house due to a trip to the cinema or the video store. Or when recording television programmes meant running up or down the stairs and pressing the record button when they were literally ‘on’. Or from the experience of having to wait up to ten or twenty minutes for games to be loaded into my ZX Spectrum etc.

These delays were inherent. Built in. Welcomed even. There was space. Time. Time to create. Reflect. Be.

Technology has decreased patience along with the capacity to accept any empty length of time as a positive factor in the equation of the experience—waiting simply creates another opportunity to gaze into another screen and skip again. Our whole media interaction to the world has become skippable but what have we lost in those moments? What is the cost?

Social media (the industry I gave up this year after being in it for over a decade) has become diluted with “experts” throwing around words like connection, transparency, authenticity, engagement, but there’s fewer voices championing trusting the consumer with making balanced choices, framing content which situates us into the now and championing taking time offline or with others.

This isn’t a one way deluge. We produce more than ever before. We are saturating each other with our requests for attention and validation that our meal or view or opinion means something beyond our own experience of it. The cloud has given us immediacy although it only fogs our view to the importance of discernment. Of choosing better.

All brands and organisations care about is eyeballs. Attention. But it’s the lingering that matters. That’s where the impact is. The video or blog post which creates space and reflection are the ones folks remember.

It’s time to take time back again. To focus on the pauses. To stop hurrying and start living in the conscious(ly created) delays. To start appreciating the slow openers again.

“We Should Have Sent A Poet Not A Pilot”

earth

50 years ago this month, Yuri Gagarin broke beyond earths gravity and floated around in space for 108 minutes. He orbited once and then returned, a hero, a legend.

Here’s how he described what he saw and felt :

“I can see clouds. I can see everything. It’s beautiful.”

“The feeling of weightlessness was somewhat unfamiliar compared with Earth conditions. Here, you feel as if you were hanging in a horizontal position in straps. You feel as if you are suspended.”

Getting the first man in space was and still is a monumental achievement in human history, although, Sergei Korolev, chief designer and scientist behind the whole Soviet space adventure, once remarked, they “should have sent a poet not a pilot”.

Reminds me of discussions with my clients around rethinking social media, especially away from just another broadcasting channel (ref : golden rule). Instead I get them to focus on exploring the opportunity to be themselves (humanisation of brands) and describe the process not product of their offerings.

The big hurdle is reversing the trend that social media sits within marketing or public relations, who, with their specific set of monologue communication skills around crafting messages for the masses or the gatekeepers of the many, fail to be conversational.

I’m not dismissing these professions just challenging the assumption to truly capture experiences you need more than simple descriptions and statements of fact but instead emotion, lyricism and sometimes (dare I say it) poetry.

(Extension and personal followup to my recent article on Why Social Media Shouldn’t Be Outsourced.)

Image credit

Origin of quote in title is from the Titanium play. Quote was also paraphrased in the film Contact.